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Table of Contents

Fillip 4 (Fall 2006)

  1. Dialogue & Distance / Warren Arcan

    Beginning with a description of the exhibition, Arcan’s piece then moves into a consideration of some of the strategies used. When the objects are considered from a political perspective, we glimpse a larger picture of the artist’s intent.

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  2. Notes on the Politics of Aesthetics / Eli Bornowsky

    Rancière prescribes a jagged network with sharp points and unusual spaces in between for thinking the complex heterologies that comprise the paradoxical foundation of our understanding of aesthetics.

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  3. Feldmann’s Tact / Christopher Brayshaw

    Unframed prints are ganged along the wall in sequences and series. Many hang from long thin pins; the curled edges of the prints shiver as you pass. Other pictures are gathered in books or cheaply bound and printed booklets, and laid out on a white examination table, with their places marked by blurry black-and-white photocopies of their covers.

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  4. Lettre de Paris / Colin Browne

    A summer trip to Paris usually includes pleasant visits to the palaces of canonical art, a couple of memorable meals, excellent markets and bookstores and, this year, just to add frisson, the excitement and perplexity of the World Cup.

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  5. Inside Out / Caroline Busta

    Working with the current excess of the art market, filmmaker and founding member of Thread Waxing Space, Miguel Abreu opens a critically engaged, while explicitly commercial, gallery on New York’s Lower East Side. Abreu’s approach is paralleled by the gallery’s recent exhibition of works by Hans Bellmer.

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  6. Art of the State / Luis Camnitzer

    Working with the current excess of the art market, filmmaker and founding member of Thread Waxing Space, Miguel Abreu opens a critically engaged, while explicitly commercial, gallery on New York’s Lower East Side. Abreu’s approach is paralleled by the gallery’s recent exhibition of works by Hans Bellmer.

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  7. We Want Everything: Assembled Thoughts on Artist-led Culture in Zürich / Barnaby Drabble

    An extract from a video I’m watching shows a familiar scene: ranks of black-clad riot police clutching shields and batons attempting to protect the entrance of a building as young protestors waving banners mill around, chant slogans, and make occasional jousting attempts to break police lines.

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  8. Your Utopia is Ours / Cao Fei and Jordan Strom

    Speaking recently of the wooden sculptural city she made for the China Month Project at Robert Wilson’s Water Mill Centre in New York, Cao Fei described the work, “like Shanghai or Manhattan,” in that it looked “very beautiful but empty inside.”

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  9. Secret Svengali / Zoë Gray
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  10. Offensive Art / Susanna Haddon

    The chilling images of “detainees” at Guantánamo Bay have become familiar enough. The kneeling figures, bound at the hands and feet, gagged, blindfolded, and often with hearing restricted have raised the tenor of discussions concerning the use of torture and the concept of “sensory deprivation.”

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  11. Mark Lewis’ Moving Pictures / Adam Harrison

    For several years, Mark Lewis has been occupied by the complicated, perhaps futile, ambition of making film works that not only deal with the history and nature of pictorial art, but may themselves act as pictures.

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  12. On Second Thought: Looking Back at the 4th Berlin Biennial / Antonia Hirsch and Melanie O'Brian

    Using the city of Berlin as its consolidating factor, the 4th Berlin Biennial, entitled Of Mice and Men was neither a slice of the “new” nor based on a theoretical conceit. With the critical debate surrounding the post-nation survey exhibition as a backdrop, the BB4 was a low-key affair that stood in contrast to the biennial habitus established in the 1990s.

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  13. "New" Museum of Modern (Contemporary) Art / Rebecca Lane

    When I visited the newly renovated Museum of Modern Art in New York for the first time since its reopening last June, I arrived with the excitement of revisiting old friends. Trips to the temporary MoMA Queens had invariably rung hollow, especially after becoming attached to the collection in its old midtown home.

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  14. Ulterior Garden Motifs / Fionn Meade

    Boys and Flowers attempts to tie together loose tendrils, balancing an assortment of photographs, prints, and paintings—all obviously floral in theme—with more nuanced and challenging video, sound, and mural installations.

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  15. Time & Space in a Biennial for Chechnya / Kristina Lee Podesva

    To think of Chechnya is to think of war and of Grozny, its capital, no longer a city as much as it is an urban ruin, providing bricks-and-mortar proof of a society and people under threat of total annihilation.

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  16. Sink and Swim: An Editorial / Jordan Strom

    It is not surprising that this issue, which has been assembled against the backdrop of escalating crisis conditions, art and the geopolitical are finding common course in contemporary art’s clouded river mouth of ideas.

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Colophon

  • Publisher: Jonathan Middleton
  • Editor: Jordan Strom
  • Managing Editor: Jeff Khonsary
  • Assistant Editor: Kristina Lee Podesva
  • Art Director: Jeff Khonsary
  • Copy Editor: Paloma Campbell
  • Editorial Board: Paloma Campbell, Jeff Khonsary, Kristina Lee Podesva, Jonathan Middleton, Jordan Strom
  • Advisory Board: Patrik Andersson, Sabine Bitter, Jeff Derksen, Antonia Hirsch, Christoph Keller, Ken Lum, Larry Rinder, Kitty Scott, Matthew Stadler, William Wood
  • Bureau Editors: Caroline Busta (New York), Sydney Hermant (Malaga), Fionn Meade (Seattle), Mark Neufeld (Berlin), Aude Pariset (Paris)
  • Edition: 1500 copies
  • Printing: Benwell Atkins, Vancouver
  • Distribution: Emma Marion (British Columbia), Speedimpex (Canada), Selectair (Australia)